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About These Blogs: The JPL Science & Technology Blogs are a way for our researchers and technical staff to give first-hand accounts of the activities that are going on at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. A cross-section of our staff contribute posts about the tasks they are currently involved in for NASA and JPL. These blog posts are meant to discuss technical topics. Selected comments that are on-topic are published and are moderated.

<< Return to Latest Entries

Topic: Earth Sciences: Atmospheric Science
09.22.2009 4:36 PM

By Hui Su

I have not blogged in the last two weeks as I was occupied by two week-long meetings in a row. The first one was the Cloud-Climate Feedback workshop hosted by the Keck Institute for Space Studies in Caltech, organized by Prof. Yuk Yung and Dr. Joao Teixeira. It was a very enlightening workshop. Students and postdocs got together with a number of world-renowned experts on clouds studies and had in-depth discussions about front-edge science regarding cloud climate feedbacks. Scientists shared their ...Read More on ''

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09.01.2009 5:59 PM

By Hui Su

Upon returning home from the GEWEX meeting in Australia, I was frightened to see flames on the mountains near my home. The wild fire started on Wednesday, August 26 and have burned more than 15,000 acres already. The temperature was triple-digit high and the humidity was less than 10%. The bushes in the Angeles Crest Forest have not burned in about 60 years, so the fire just kept spreading with so much fuel. The sky is filled with dense smoky clouds and the air smells terrible. White ashes accumulate ...Read More on ''

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08.18.2009 4:06 PM

By Hui Su

Speaking of hurricane research, people probably won’t think of JPL as an important player. However, there are a lot of scientists in the lab who are interested in hurricanes and there are a lot of instruments developed at JPL that are very useful for hurricane forecasts. About two years ago, Dr. Yi Chao initiated a hurricane seminar series and it evolved into a hurricane research group with more than 20 scientists and engineers from various disciplines. The virtual hurricane group (I am an active ...Read More on ''

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08.11.2009 4:25 PM

By Hui Su

Prof. Bin Wang from the University of Hawaii visited JPL on Wednesday, August 5. He is a renowned expert on hurricane research and atmospheric dynamics. He led a proposal to NASA Hurricane Science Research Program (ROSES08) last year, in which Brian Kahn and I are JPL Co-Is. The proposal has been selected. His visit thus marked the official start of our collaborations. Bin presented very impressive WRF simulations of concentric eyewall replacement to form annular hurricane, which is a type of “monster” ...Read More on ''

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07.21.2009 11:53 AM

By Hui Su

I spend most of my time writing the proposal to ROSES09 A18 (CloudSat/CALIPSO science team recompete) last week and need to prepare for two talks this week: one at the MLS regular group meeting on Thursday and one for the CloudSat meeting next week in Wisconsin. I am sorry that I don't have much time to write on the blog. Talk to you next week... ...Read More on ''

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06.30.2009 11:12 AM

By Hui Su

The Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on NASA’s Aura satellite measures a suite of atmospheric gases, temperature and cloud ice in the limb view of Earth’s atmosphere from microwave thermal emissions. I use mainly the MLS water vapor and cloud ice products to study climate variabilities. Some of my colleagues in the MLS group make use of MLS products, such as carbon monoxide (CO), ozone (O3), nitrous oxide (N2O), chlorine monoxide (CLO), nitric acid (HNO3), HCL, and HCN, etc, to study atmospheric tracer ...Read More on ''

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Author Bios

Erik Bailey
Guidance and Control Systems Engineering
Julie Castillo
Planetary Ices
Parker Fagrelius
Astronomy and Physics Missions Concepts
Chuck Manning
Microdevices Laboratory
Jeff Norris
Supervisor, Planning Software Systems Group
Tom Roberts
Optical Communications
Ruwan Somawardhana
Spacecraft Thermal Engineering


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