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About These Blogs: The JPL Science & Technology Blogs are a way for our researchers and technical staff to give first-hand accounts of the activities that are going on at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. A cross-section of our staff contribute posts about the tasks they are currently involved in for NASA and JPL. These blog posts are meant to discuss technical topics. Selected comments that are on-topic are published and are moderated.

<< Return to Latest Entries

Topic: Earth Sciences: Climate
11.10.2009 4:50 PM

By Hui Su

Today, it was JPL’s R&TD, DRDF and SURP Poster Conference. This is an annual event organized by the Office of the Chief Scientist and Chief Technologist (OCSCT). It presents the latest advances in science and technology funded by JPL’s discretionary funds, the Research and Technology Development (R&TD), Director's Research and Development Fund (DRDF), and Strategic University Research Partnership (SURP) programs. I was one of the presenters because I received the Lew Allen Award for Excellence last ...Read More on ''

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10.20.2009 3:53 PM

By Hui Su

Last Thursday, October 15, was an exciting day for bloggers. It was the Blog Action Day, an annual event that bloggers around the world post about the same issue on the same day on their own blogs, with the aim of sparking discussion around an issue of global importance. This year, the topic was climate change. I represented JPL to write a blog about the roles of clouds play in climate change and how NASA JPL contributes to the studies of clouds and climate change (see http://blogs.jpl.nasa.gov). ...Read More on ''

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10.06.2009 5:26 PM

By Hui Su

I work closely with my colleague, Dr. Jonathan Jiang, to study interactions among aerosols, clouds, water vapor and precipitation. Besides analyzing satellite data, we plan to expand our work to use the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) model. Combining multi-satellite observations, we can obtain correlations between various measurements; however, the causal relationships can not be easily determined. Thus, we are going to use a dynamic model with interactive aerosol-cloud module to study the ...Read More on ''

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08.04.2009 12:53 PM

By Hui Su

I was at the CloudSat/CALIPSO Science Team Meeting last week in Madison, Wisconsin. There were a lot of interesting presentations. The two active sensors have provided us very rich information of the structure of clouds and aerosols. The vertical resolution and global coverage are unprecedented. Combined with other A-train satellite instruments, scientists have gained a lot of new knowledge of cloud processes (including microphysical and macrophysical processes), aerosol effects on clouds (many ...Read More on ''

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07.14.2009 4:09 PM

By Hui Su

I attended the Gordon Research Conference (GRC) in Radiation and Climate last week in New London, New Hampshire. It was my first Gordon conference and I found it very rewarding. This year's speakers and discussion leaders are all world-class scientists in climate research. Their talks covered the frontiers of climate research, some of which are far from being understood and probably will continue to be challenging for many years, for example, aerosols and clouds. Our progress in cloud modeling has ...Read More on ''

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07.07.2009 8:23 AM

By Hui Su

Continuing to talk about MLS data products, I want to mention some very nice work using MLS carbon monoxide measurements led by my colleague, Dr. Jonathan Jiang. Jonathan pioneered using MLS CO as a proxy for in-cloud aerosols, based on a close correlation of CO with aerosol optical thickness (AOT) from MODIS over the South America region during biomass burning season. In a paper published in 2008 (GRL), Jonathan and his co-authors (including me) found that the “polluted” clouds defined by high ...Read More on ''

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06.23.2009 12:53 PM

By Hui Su

Last week started off with welcoming my summer student, Ms. Huiwen Chuang, from the University of Michigan. She will work with me for 10 weeks this summer to analyze water vapor variability using AIRS and MLS data as well as IPCC model simulations. She spun up quickly and impressed me with the nice plots of AIRS water vapor time series for four ocean basins on the third day after her arrival in JPL. I expect a productive summer for her and me.

Prof. Richard Johnson visited JPL on June 18 and ...Read More on ''

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06.15.2009 2:29 PM

By Hui Su

An excitement happened last week was the meeting with Dr. Ed Weiler, associate administrator of the NASA Science Missions Directorate on Tuesday, June 9. I was asked by Dr. Diane Evans (JPL's Director for the Earth Science and Technology Directorate) and Dr. Randy Friedl (JPL’s Earth Science and Technology Directorate Chief Scientist) to give a short presentation to Dr. Ed Weiler about our recent work on CloudSat data analysis and comparison of observed and modeled cloud profiles (see last week’s ...Read More on ''

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06.08.2009 4:02 PM

By Hui Su

Just like many others on the lab, I joggle between several projects which involve the impacts of water vapor, clouds and aerosols on climate change. I work closely with my colleague in the Microwave Atmospheric Science group, Dr. Jonathan Jiang, on most of these projects. One of the topics we have been working on is to analyze observed cloud profiles and use them to evaluate cloud simulations in climate models. Our unique approach is to examine cloud profiles binned by large-scale state variables, ...Read More on ''

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06.04.2009 2:08 PM

By Brian Kahn

One of the profound scientific problems in the climate sciences is about building a realistic climate modeling (on computers) capability of clouds. If we can’t do this right, we can’t improve our future predictions of climate all that much. NASA makes an incredibly wide variety of ongoing measurements of clouds, temperature and humidity on a global basis from satellites. These measurements make it possible to observe what we should calculate in the climate forecasting models.

However, it is ...Read More on ''

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Author Bios

Erik Bailey
Guidance and Control Systems Engineering
Julie Castillo
Planetary Ices
Parker Fagrelius
Astronomy and Physics Missions Concepts
Chuck Manning
Microdevices Laboratory
Jeff Norris
Supervisor, Planning Software Systems Group
Tom Roberts
Optical Communications
Ruwan Somawardhana
Spacecraft Thermal Engineering


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